As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc in India, the startup and investor community has stepped up its efforts to reach more people in need. Venture capitalist Vinod Khosla, among the most prominent Indian American names in Silicon Valley, has been at the forefront of the donation drive to help India in this time of crisis.

On Monday morning, he tweeted that the Khosla family is adding $10 million to the Give India Foundation and hoping others will join in. There is a large and urgent need, and a day’s delay costs lives, he said, adding that one day at one hospital without oxygen had eight people die gasping for breath.

Last week, the Sun Microsystems co-founder had said he will coordinate grants and sourcing through the Give India Foundation. This was after he pledged money to hospitals that needed oxygen supply.

On Sunday, India became the first country to register more than 400,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day since the pandemic began. Of this, Delhi alone accounted for more than 25,000 new infections and 412 deaths.

Even as the country is struggling to keep pace with vaccinating its population, severe oxygen shortage and poor health infrastructure is burdening the already fragile healthcare system in the country. A severe shortage of oxygen has led to hundreds of deaths and forced people to turn away patients. While some people have already procured oxygen concentrators, others are importing a large number of oxygenerators.

Prominent investors and entrepreneurs have taken to social media platforms to pledge their money and support to help hospitals and other organisations in the fight against Covid-19.

An increasing number of companies and wealthy individuals are partnering with non-governmental organisations and crowdfunding platforms to raise donations.

On April 24, Khosla had reached out to hospitals in India looking for funding to import oxygen supplies to shore up resources amid the crisis. “I’m willing to fund hospitals in India that need funding to import bulk planeloads of oxygen or supplies into India to increase supply. Public hospitals/NGOs also pls reach out,” he tweeted.

Khosla was earlier a partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers. The IIT Delhi graduate started his own venture capital fund Khosla Ventures in 2004.

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